Friday, April 18, 2014

TIMES WERE SO DIFFERENT DURUNG ROSETTA'S FIRST YEAR

ROSETTA SCHWARTZ, whose story is told in "CAN WE COME IN AND LAUGH, TOO?" was born November 18, 1909
WHAT WAS IT LIKE IN 1910? 
Reprinted from http://kclibrary.lonestar.edu/decade10.html
Traveling in the 1910s by taxi, ice truck and chauffeurChildren were hired to work in factories, mills, and mines for long hours in unsafe and unhealthy conditions.  Though efforts to pass a federal law proved unsuccessful, by the middle of this decade every state had passed a minimum age law.   A commission found that up to 20% of the children living in cities were undernourished, education took second place to hunger and while children worked, only one-third enrolled in elementary school and less than 10% graduated from high school.  The status of the Negro worsened.  Skilled negro workers were barred from the AF of L.   Women were also striving for equality.The first suffrage parade was held in 1910 - the 19th amendment finally ratified in 1919.

ROSETTA MANAGED TO GET A TWO-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION AND SELF- EDUCATED THE REST OF HER LONG LIFE---NEARLY 97 YEARS!

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

ON MARCH 26, 1910 ROSETTA WAS 4 MONTHS OLD!

How interesting to realize that when Rosetta Schwartz was 4 months old the Wright Brothers were just beginning to instruct aspiring pilots how to fly their newfangled invention - the aeroplane!


The Wright Flying School, also known as the Wright School of Aviation, was operated by the Wright Company from 1910 to 1916 and trained 119 individuals to fly Wright airplanes.


The Wright Flying School in Birmingham, Alabama. Later this became the site of Maxwell Air Force Base.
When she moved to California from Chicago in 1953 she flew aboard a propeller plane. The trip took over 8 hours and the few people who flew got very dressed up to travel. For women it was a hat and gloves. For men, suit an tie.

Now we zip all over the world in relatively few hours, often wearing comfortable sweats. Particularly when flying to far-away destinations like Europe, Australia, Asia, Africa and more. Something unthought of in Rosetta's day when those places could only be reached by ship.

 
 

Thursday, October 3, 2013

You can still download the Kindle editon of Can We Come in and Laugh, Too? FREE

Rosetta still in her teens
This PJ party picture might have started the "Crash of '29." It was probably right around that time
You still have until midnight tomorrow to download a FREE copy of Can We Come in and Laugh, Too? Rosetta was one of those ordinary women with the extraordinary ability to Currently #6 in the Top 100 Free Memoirs and #16 in Top 100 free Biographies. make people believe in themselves and find the silver lining in every cloud. My sister and I were so fortunate to have her in our lives for so many years -- How many make it to 97 and are writing their one and only book at 80? http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=laugh+with+rosetta

Saturday, September 21, 2013

The North Pole was discovered in 1909, the year Rosetta was born



Over a century ago, explorer Robert Peary earned fame for discovering the North Pole, 
but did Frederick Cook get there first?


Frederick Cook and Robert Peary

On September 7, 1909, readers of the New York Times awakened to a stunning front-page headline: "Peary Discovers the North Pole After Eight Trials in 23 Years." The North Pole was one of the last remaining laurels of earthly exploration, a prize for which countless explorers from many nations had suffered and died for 300 years. And here was the American explorer Robert E. Peary sending word from Indian Harbour, Labrador, that he had reached the pole in April 1909, one hundred and four years ago this month. The Times story alone would have been astounding. But it wasn't alone.

A week earlier, the New York Herald had printed its own front-page headline: "The North Pole is Discovered by Dr. Frederick A. Cook." Cook, an American explorer who had seemingly returned from the dead after more than a year in the Arctic, claimed to have reached the pole in April 1908—a full year before Peary.
Anyone who read the two headlines would know that the North Pole could be "discovered" only once. The question then was: Who had done it?

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Cook-vs-Peary.html#ixzz2fXORAanI

Friday, June 21, 2013

#3 IN FREE KINDLE MEMOIRS - #9 IN FREE HUMOR

1920s - Rosetta is in the middle of the second row

This isn't a mystery, but Rosetta was the inspiration for 80 year-old Flossie, the Silver Sisters' mother, in the Silver Sisters Mysteries. The only crime here would be if you don't download a copy while it is still FREE.

I edited this book and this morning woke up to a nice surprise. Here are the rankings for "CAN WE COME IN AND LAUGH, TOO?" in the FREE Kindle store at 6:30am PST:
PLEASE HELP PUSH IT TO #1 AND THE TOP 100 in FREE Kindle


 Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #820 Free in Kindle Store
    #3 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Biographies & Memoirs > Memoirs
    #9 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Humor & Entertainment > Humor

THE FREE OFFER ENDS AT MIDNIGHT.

Thursday, June 20, 2013

CAN WE COME IN AND LAUGH, TOO? now at #7 in FREE Kindle Memoirs

Rosetta in 2004 at 95

Rosetta in 1923 at 23









TWO DAY FREE OFFER - KINDLE EDITION OF "CAN WE COME IN AND LAUGH, TOO?"

Today is the first day of the TWO DAY FREE OFFER for the Kindle edition of Rosetta Schwartz's charming memoir CAN WE COME IN AND LAUGH, TOO? She was the youngest of ten children, born into a zany immigrant family in 1909, and throughout her long life (almost 97 years) she was an ordinary woman with the extraordinary ability to make people believe in themselves---and no matter how bad things got, she always got through it with humor. When she was a child, there was so much laughter in her family, neighbors knocked at the door to ask if they could come in and laugh too. It is currently at #25 in Kindle Store Memoirs.